Irish Waters

Quite a trip it was!

Such a picturesque land of navigating waters, waves slashing against rocks invincible and the cordoned beauty of the suburban lands! Well, we never wanted to come back but civilisation has its own perils and we are bound by its torrid tentacles.

A quick round up of what unfolded in 3 days and how astounding our lives looked till we took the road back to insanity.

Day 1 – The Beginning of Boundaries

It all started in Belfast, the city so gorgeously appearing to enjoy the bliss of its eloquence.

Day 2 – Game of Thrones Tour with Giant’s Causeway

What can I say about this ethereal day! Words are not enough but the scenes are just floating around my eyes. Rest, I will let divinity do the talking.

Day 3 – Birth of Tragedy

Belfast is home to the most iconic masterpiece that never lived – ‘Titanic’. It was built and designed in Belfast, but the ‘unsinkable’ could only replicate its stature in the history books. The story of its making and its inevitable demise is equally riveting and colossal. And after lunch, we drive through Belfast by-lanes, watch the sunset by the harbour, few more shots with my wife and son before deciding to call it a day.

Stay in Marriott

Ravishing, as usual. Food was, uh, tad disappointing but Uber Eats compensated for the otherwise comfortable and contagious stay.

Human Sans Logic

If man has to choose between money and man, he will go straight for money. In a world of such perennial aura and superlative torrents, ‘Triple Frontier’ offers solace. But I am quite deterred by the aftermath depicted.

How on earth do you manage to infiltrate in to the den of a most wanted Narco terrorist with a bunch of extremely self motivated ex army men equipped with state-of-the-art logistics and no one blinks an eye? Worse, the narco terrorist whose forest wrenched mansion was just ambushed, doesn’t care to retaliate and they are left alone to happily walk away with all the booty?!

The plot here hangs in an unknown frontier, this time.

Bazaar – Bizarre Market

Certainly not ‘Wolf of Wall Street’, but tries to come close. Share market, ‘Bullish’ vibes, the inevitable passion to brutally excel in what you play for and deny the eventual – these are traits for the ones who dare to enter this playground with balls aplenty.

‘Bazaar’ falters in the last 30 minutes or so, but still remains watchable till the penultimate frame. It brings back Saif Ali Khan to do what he does best – remain subtle, hold on to his natural histrionics and act. Which he does impressively, and it solely remains to be his film. I seriously think he should stop doing those baseless Rom-Coms, which looks so jaded and irrelevant to our times. He has much more left in him as long as we have scripts with meat.

Watch it for Saif, his plot and others.

Blackmail – Vengeance is Inside

When does a person blackmail another person?

When he realises that he is being screwed upright behind his back and still expected to believe that things are hunky dory between the mundane episodes of life.

Well, that’s exactly the plot here. What you are bracing for is an entertaining series of encounters and the fetish yet evil face of human adversity. One follows another, a vicious circle develops and ends up destroying each of their lives. Well, you can argue if they ever had one.

A Seer’s Rage – Episode 2

Madhu grew up in a land of priests and religious fanaticism. Not surprisingly, his thought process was quite inclined towards his Father’s during his younger days. But as days went by and he grew older, time and education taught him a wider aspect of his faltering childhood.

Close to his mother but in awe of his father. Madhu’s situation was quite disturbing and precarious. But he was a kind, noble and compassionate person. Perhaps, his roots have him given him the foundation he needed.

Madhu does see himself as the son of the Patriarch but doesn’t essentially see him in his Father’s shoes. In fact, Literature fascinates Madhu ever since his school days and now as he confronts his end-of-school days, he is quite convinced not to pursue his Father’s legacy against his unsurpassable wish to get his degree in Literature.

Madhu’s inclination towards Literature comes from his Mother. A school teacher in Banaras Christian Community School before she got married, Madhu’s mother was also adept in writing short stories for few small publications in the town. Yes, she quit long back but Madhu has inherited his mother’s talent.

He plans to inform his father about his plans though he is equally crumbled under fear to talk about his proposition with his Father. On the other hand, his mother is on his side and encourages him to do what he wants.

சர்வம் தாளமயம் – Refreshingly Rythmic

I have not watched a musical for a long time now. They don’t make classic musicals any more.

But ‘சர்வம் தாளமயம்’ bought back poignant moments in a musical journey which stands out as simple, light hearted and make-you-feel-good drama with an outstanding soundtrack, which in many ways describes A R Rahman – The Master Composer.

Carnatic Music with a blend of vocal magic and art of percussion instruments. I love the semblance of anything which is connected to our roots, and this is just so apt.

Thank you Rajiv Menon, for giving us a glimpse of the ‘Mozart of Madras’, just like old days.

A Seer’s Rage – Episode 1

A land of spiritual resurgence. We need messiahs, someone who can turn this world upside down, in the right way. Not a torch bearer, but we need tools for sustenance.

Madhuprayan George Roy was born in Banaras, India to a Hindu Father and Catholic Mother. His father belonged to an ancestral Priest family and one of the oldest patriarch in the city of Banaras. Not surprisingly, an orthodox family with strong spiritual roots and a legacy that takes you back to 18th century, Madhu (as he was fondly called by his parents and friends), had a conventional and often, difficult childhood.

Being bought up in a situation of ‘Priesthood’ isn’t easy. His father was a staunch, god fearing priest in one of the oldest temples in Banaras. Quote obviously and inevitable, hugely respected across the religious circles, in and around Banaras. This made things even more difficult for Madhu. He was scared to talk to his father.

Madhu’s father was a good man but his approach towards his son was whimsical. He was a responsible father but not a doting one. His position in the town made him almost invincible to others and untenable to his son. This was not going down very well with Madhu.

His mother, though equally conventional and a devoted Catholic, was a compassionate and caring mother to Madhu. Madhu was very close to her and the fact that his parents got married in a twist of fate also meant that he was more emotionally inclined to his mother than his father. His mother understood Madhu’s dilemma but was equally intimidated by her husband’s position in the realms of Banaras. She was not scared of her influential husband but had her own reasons to adopt submission.

Bird Box – Eyes Underrated

‘Bird Box’ stormed Netflix when it hit the streaming giant a month ago.

I am still wondering why. An alien power that powers suicidal and psychotic behaviour to literally end a civilization that’s busy being normal people who are going to work, have families and where women get pregnant. But, what’s the point?

I am okay when lines like ‘apocalypse’ and ‘end of the world’ are doing the rounds. But invisibility does not garner as much credibility as much as something which is more scientifically debated and consumed.

But never mind. Sandra Bullock, welcome back!

Again, But No Love..

If ‘Narcos’ had not happened to me, I would have rendered kind words for ‘Loving Pablo’. ‘Narcos’ was such a stunning and provocative account of the (de)famed Drug Lord that everything else pales in comparison. And, so does this film.

Sorry, Javier and Penelope. I love you guys, but you picked up a stalemate this time. Pablo Escobar became history twice – once when he died and second time around, when ‘Narcos’ was unleashed.

Can’t love him more, hate him enough!

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